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Linguistics: noun genders, knock-knock jokes, baby sign language, and more August 4, 2015

Posted by Erin Ptah in News Roundup.
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“Linguists call these categories “genders” because that’s always been the term for this sort of noun class. This makes more sense when you learn that grammatical gender came long before the idea of psychological gender, which we will definitely cover in a future column, because oh my god, talk about blowing my mind.”

From cooing and babbling to utterance in American Sign Language.”

“When it came to bilingual speakers, they seemed to switch between these perspectives based on the language context they were given the task in.”

“Knock-knock. Who’s there? A gang of vigilantes armed with machine guns, leather straps and brass knuckles to thump the breath out of anybody who persists in playing this blame fool knock-knock game.” Quote from 1936. Knock-knock jokes have a long and controversial history, apparently.

Reflections on what a bunch of people have said about their passwords, including the memories, codes, jokes, and secrets embedded in them. (Other than the secret of “what is my password”, that is.)

“Revealed for the first time, thanks to the big data generated by gazillions of tweets: the geography of dudeness.”

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