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Stories about people who clashed with police and survived (somehow, never with the police’s help) July 24, 2016

Posted by Erin Ptah in News Roundup.
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People killed by police, 2016. 648 and counting.

The list of young people burdened by these tumultuous times includes Tamir Rice’s teenage sister, who lost 50 pounds after watching the police shoot him in 2014; the daughter of Oscar Grant III, killed by a transit officer while lying down on a California train platform in 2009, who as a 5-year-old would ask playmates to duck when she saw the police; and the 9-year-old nephew of Sandra Bland, who began sleeping in his mother’s room after Ms. Bland’s death last year in a jail cell.”

“He smiles and says that a few citizens in Janeville called the police because of a suspicious black man in a white car was parked at the Wharf for a couple hours. My response, ‘Really? I was just reading a book.’

“After two previous mistrials, a federal judge has acquitted former police officer Eric Parker, who was charged with violating a Indian citizen’s civil rights after throwing him to the ground and partially paralyzing him during a sidewalk stop last year.” Sureshbhai Patel was a 57-year-old grandfather who spoke almost no English, and had just moved in to help care for his new grandchild.

“When [Danny] Sanchez saw the incident, and the SWAT team converge, he began recording from his garage. He assumed there wouldn’t be any problem, since he was so far away from the incident, on his own property and even out on the edge of the garage.”

After firing 107 bullets at the innocent women, the LAPD cops ordered them out of the vehicle and immediately realized their mistake. Instead of a 33-year-old black man, two Hispanic women exited the pickup truck and demanded to know, ‘Why did you shoot at us?'” Margie Carranza and Emma Hernandez.

“He was crying. He kept saying, ‘Mom! Mom!,’ trying to tell me what happened. ‘Shoot, shoot. Police, police. Blood.’” Arnaldo Eliud Rios Soto, the autistic man whose caregiver Charles Kinsey was shot while lying on his back with his hands up.

“In fact, in reviewing nearly every publicly available video of a police shooting over the past year or so, it is close to impossible to find footage of an officer aiding the person who has been shot.

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