Tag Archive | history

Awesome Women: pirates, lesbian weddings past & present, and topless Victorian fight club

“Up until her death in 1914 at the age of 82, Old West badass “Stagecoach” Mary Fields had a standing bet at her local saloon: Five bucks and a glass of whiskey said she could knock out any cowboy in Cascade, Montana with a single punch. After the third or fourth dumb asshole tried to take her up on it, nobody ever had the balls to do it again.

“The first recorded duel between English women took place in 1792 over an insult about age. Lady Almeria Braddock and Mrs. Elphinstone exchanged pistol shots at ten yards, missed each other and then concluded the event with smallswords. Upon drawing blood from Mrs. Elphinstone’s elbow, Lady Braddock declared her honor satisfied, and the two curtsied to each other and left the field. Witnesses agreed that the ladies conducted themselves with great courage and dignity.” A history of women in European dueling.

The first rule of topless victorian ladies swordfighting club is that topless victorian ladies swordfighting club is not to be mentioned in mixed company.”

These look like some gorgeous examples of WWII-themed steampunk cosplay. Look like.

“An LGBT blogger and her partner became the first gay couple to get married at Tokyo Disney last Friday, undeterred by a lack of legal recognition for same-sex partnerships in Japan.” (Their dresses are so pretty.)

So, okay, we know that the most successful pirate in history was Ching Shih, a Chinese woman. And her gender wasn’t exactly an outlier, either.

The highest-ranked weightlifter in America is one Sarah Robles. Not highest-ranked female weightlifter, but highest-ranked weightlifter, period. And she was still having trouble getting a sponsor in time for the Olympics last year — although, in a credit to justice, she finally did.

“During the 19th century, women in what some Victorians referred to as “female marriages” lived together, owned property in common, called each other “hubby” or “wedded wife” and were recognised as a couple, including by the traditionalists among their neighbours and friends.”

Science & history: Muslim inventors, pro-choice establishment Christians, pre-tourism Japan, and more

“So there my friend stood, in 1990, in Jericho, believing that the universe was 5,994* years old and staring at a man-made wall that was 8,000 years old.

20 Muslim inventions that shaped our world. You probably know about algebra, but what about quilting, windmills, and fountain pens?

If you were born in or after April 1985, if you are right now 27 years old or younger, you have never lived through a month that was colder than average.

Images from 1910: “Photographer Kozaburo was the first to produce tourist shots for Japan with an album of 51 collotype black and white photographic prints, which were painstakingly inked in by a team of 100 colourists, and gave Europe one of its first glimpses of life inside the previously secretive state.” Includes some beautifully-chosen then-and-now comparison shots.

Views on abortion from various Christian establishment groups in 1978. Episcopals, Lutherans, Presbyterians, and others articulating positions that are thoughtful, reasonable, and pro-choice.

…the women who were turned away from an abortion were more likely to rely on government assistance, more likely to be living beneath the poverty line, and less likely to have a full-time job than the women in the study who had obtained abortions. They also registered more anxiety a week after they were denied an abortion and reported more stress a year out. They were no more or less likely to be depressed. And women who gave birth suffered from more serious health complications […] than the women who aborted, even later in their pregnancies.”

“The first photographic images in the late 1820s had to be exposed for hours in order to capture them on film. Improvements in the technology led to this exposure time being drastically cut down to minutes, then seconds, throughout the 19th century. […] Seems children were just as squirmy then as they are today, because another amusing convention developed: photographs containing hidden mothers trying to keep their little ones still enough for a non-blurry picture.”

6 Ridiculous Lies You Believe About the Founding of America: the title is kind of a misnomer, as the topic is more “ridiculous misinformation you believe about the state of America before the Europeans got here.”

Anderson Cooper, Jigglypuff, serious stuff about copyright and sexism, and Red Dwarf

Or, “miscellaneous fannish links of neatness.”

Buzzfeed compiles fanart of Anderson Cooper. Oh, hey, some of those are awfully familiar. (#15 is one of mine.)

“A Whole New World” as sung by Jigglypuff and Professor Oak. Or at least, fans doing solid impressions of them. The Internet: it’s a thing of beauty.

Q&A with Rebecca Tushnet about copyright and transformative works. A good overview of the subject.

“….during the teens, 1920s, and early 1930s, almost one quarter of the screenwriters in Hollywood were women. Half of all the films copyrighted between 1911 and 1925 were written by women.” Our forgotten film history.

Media monopolies: why “Mrs. Robinson” has been played enough times to air for 32 years back-to-back nonstop.

The high-tech digital makeup used to get one (originally buff) actor playing both pre- and post-superserum Captain America.

And the most awesome thing to break in the past few days: the new Red Dwarf trailer is out! A shot-by-shot breakdown, for anyone who wants to get as much mileage out of the tiny clips as possible. (*cough* Such as myself.)

Fandom news!

Fallout from this interview is hitting the Interwebs.

For a snapshot of ten years of media fandom history, and why our collective increased visibility is not The End Of Fandom As We Know It, read over here.

If you’re concerned about your personal privacy, check out these simple steps.

In unrelated news, someone writes fic reviews and someone else is upset, leading to a refreshingly righteous rant that there is no universal definition of civility and a semi-related discussion of how concrit is darn hard to give.

Many of the posts on this subject (metafandom has more) have a chorus of commenters exclaiming, “Where are these people who give criticism, and how can I get them to read my fic?” Count me in.