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Friday night bright spots May 12, 2017

Posted by Erin Ptah in News Roundup.
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Ordinary Canadians had essentially adopted thousands of Syrian families, donating a year of their time and money to guide them into new lives just as many other countries shunned them. Some citizens already considered the project a humanitarian triumph; others believed the Syrians would end up isolated and adrift, stuck on welfare or worse. As 2016 turned to 2017 and the yearlong commitments began to expire, the question of how the newcomers would fare acquired a national nickname: Month 13, when the Syrians would try to stand on their own.” I wish I had the money to do this. It’s so heartwarming, and sounds so fulfilling.

A showcase of Muslims who risked their lives to help Jewish people escape the Holocaust. This is what heroism looks like.

“The same exact pattern happened in 2016, Phelps said: A wage increase by the state [of California] led to a bump in business. Now Phelps is convinced that minimum wage increases aren’t bad for the fast food business. They’re great.

Employment at Arizona restaurants, bars surges after minimum-wage increase. There’s also been a bump in the rest of the leisure and hospitality sector. (Manufacturing is still going down. Retail too, thanks to online shopping.)

A recycling initiative for hotel toiletries: “Last year Clean the World sent out 400,000 hygiene kits and made more than 7 million bars of soap, including half a million bars for Haiti and the Bahamas after Hurricane Matthew.”

“Based on an advanced copy of America’s budget for the 2017 financial year, it looks like there has been an actual increase in science funding across the board, and rather wonderfully, Trump’s requests to have it cut have been comprehensively ignored.” (Now it just has to pass.)

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Where the money goes. January 22, 2013

Posted by Erin Ptah in News Roundup.
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“They would give poor families in rural Kenya $1,000 over the course of 10 months, and let them do whatever they wanted with the money.” And it appears to be working wonders.

“Do you want to give food? Add up its retail price. Take that money out of your wallet. Flush 90% of it down the toilet. Send the food bank the rest. You’re still helping more than if you gave the food.

“The profits in this racket are downright hallucinogenic: A military veteran sharing his story with Occupy Student Debt has paid $18,000 on a $2,500 loan, and Sallie Mae claims he still owes $5,000; the husband of a social worker bankrupt and bedridden after a botched surgery tells Student Loan Justice of a $13,000 college loan balance from the 1980s that ballooned to $70,000. A grandmother subsisting on Social Security has her payments garnished to pay off a $20,000 loan balance resulting from a $3,500 loan she took out 10 years ago, before she underwent brain surgery….The finances of Sallie Mae, the former government sponsored enterprise formally called SLM Corp, are a bit difficult to divine, but the operating profit margin is over 50 percent.

“A time-share mogul who makes a string of bad bets during a bubble can slip away from $18.5 million in debt. But a working-class family hit by job loss or injury can be permanently impoverished by an $18.5 thousand debt, with no means of escape. Until now.”

“I long assumed that if you’re fortunate enough to be in the top 2 percent, you can at least afford an accountant or financial advisor to explain the basics to you.

Nonprofit outpost of Panera to open in Brookline. No prices, just suggested donations, and you pay whatever you can afford.

Job openings ticked up 11,000 last month to 3.67 million, the Labor Department said Thursday. That’s about 12 percent more than were advertised in the same month a year ago. The number of available jobs is slowly climbing back to the roughly 4 million that were advertised each month before the recession began in December 2007. More than 12 million people were unemployed in November. That means there were 3.3 unemployed people, on average, competing for each open job. That’s the lowest ratio since November 2008.”

In Memory of Hellsing October 5, 2008

Posted by Erin Ptah in Fandom.
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It’s over. Let’s celebrate a run well run.

Donations go directly to the Red Cross. If every Hellsing fan gave one dollar, we’d have enough to feed every local peace-minded vampire for a year.